Transpac 2011

Click to View the Official Pegasus Results and Race Log

Q and A time With Pegasus’s Philippe Kahn,

Published on 07-09-2011 06:18 AM

Earlier this year we got a glimpse of the past playing with the future when Philippe Kahn’s freshly remodified Alan Andrew’s 70′ came out of the shed from Southern California’s Dencho Marineand dubbed the “Waikiki 70”. The Pegasus program has had a virtual armada of boats which have competed in the Transpac or Pacific Cup Races, ranging from the 77′ “Super Sled”, a turboed 70′, a TP 52 and most recently an Open 50 which Philippe doublehanded across the Pacific.

We were able to catch Philippe working at his nav station just after the start of the low raters in the Point Fermin to Diamond Head Race and get some keener insights into this latest edition of the Pegasus Fleet.

What spurned the idea of the Waikiki 70?

PK- “Surfing to Honolulu. Sailing down the waves as opposed to reaching fast across them.”

There are 7 “Sleds” in division 3 of this years Transpac (If you include Cheetah) ranging in rating from 82.221 to 93.873,
What would be the ideal target range for the Waikiki-70’s?

PK- I’m really not sure. I’m used to sailing dinghies, skiffs and one-design keel boats. We focused on getting the boat close to the original specs while using contemporary deck and interior layouts.

How much in terms of modifications were involved in bringing Pegasus Motion X into the “Box” ? (Reduction in Mast, boom, scoops or overhangs, keel mods etc?)

PK- Chopped the mast, spinnaker pole, got rid of the bow sprit, shortened the keel. Everything to get close to an original sled.

Are there some established tolerences and guidelines existing, and if so what would they be?
PK- The Southern California fleet has been using ORR with success. That works.

Of the top of your head how many “70”ish sleds were originally produced, and later modified or turboed, any educated estimates of how many boats are still out there which could be demodified or deturboed and fit into the fleet? (Including Great Lakes and Seattle Area Boats)

PK- There are more than 20 I believe.

Any other owners potentially getting onboard so to speak?

PK We hear that they are. The great racing on this Transpac will help.

Rumour has it Pegasus has self leveling (rotating port to starboard) nav station, can you give us details on that?

PK sorry to disappoint, the boat is very simple and practical. No high tech moving parts.

Any other upgrades during the modification process that makes her unique?

PK We focused on making her a beautiful classic. The classical surfing sled.

Are plans/hopes for the fleet to compete in additional down hill events, ie Spinnaker Cup, Coastal Cup, Mexican Races?

PK- All good possibilities.

You’ll be racing with 11 on this boat after several years in Transpac and Pac Cup just double handed, how do you compare the difference, and are the long distance double handed events a thing of the past?

PK I like change. We established two good double handed Transpacific records. We thought that it would be fun to surf to Honolulu with 10 friends. I love double- handed racing. There will be more

Thanks Philippe, good luck and happy surfing!

Pegasus-MotionX, with Philippe Kahn and Mark Christensen smash double handed Transpacific record by more than 2 days

The record for double-handing the Transpacific Yacht Race from Los Angeles to Honolulu has been broken. At 4:38:35 am HST today, Philippe Kahn and Mark “Crusty” Christensen, crossed the Diamond Head finish line in the Open 50, Pegasus 50, in a record time of 7 days, 19 hours, 38 minutes and 35 seconds. They shaved over two and a half days off of the previous record set by Howard Gordon and Jay Crum in 2001 also with an Open 50, Etranger in the most enduring and greatest ocean race in the world covering 2,225 nautical miles from Los Angeles to Honolulu.

Click here for the Official Pegasus Race Log

Pegasus Wins Waikiki Offshore Series

The 2005 Waikiki Offshore Series finished Saturday with two windward leeward races off Waikiki. The medium trade winds and small seas were a welcome relief from the 8 – 12 foot seas and 35+ kts winds that challenged the racers all week.

Philippe Kahn’s Transpac 52 Pegasus turned in a stellar performance with 8 firsts out of 9 races. Winning first in Division 1 and first overall to earn the King Kamehameha Trophy. A hand carved Koa wood replica of the Hawaiian Sailing Canoe Hokule’a. “I sail everywhere around the world and the conditions in Hawaii were the best: Winds from 15 to 35 knots and waves from 1 to 12 ft, tropical waters and unbelievably beautiful scenery. It doesn’t get better than this!” said Kahn.

Click here for photos of Pegasus racing in the Waikiki Offshore Series

Charles Burnett’s Transpac 52 Braveheart finished 2nd in Division 1 and 3rd overall. Isao Mita’s R/P 72 Beecom finished 3rd in division 1 and 7th overall.

In Division 2, Dave Nottage’s J44 Kaimiloa III came back from a broken boom in race 8 to finished first in Division 2 and second overall. Kaimiloa also won the award for Top Hawaiian Boat. John Myhre & Harvey Arkin’s Farr 43 Flash Gordon finished second in Division 2 and 5th overall. Gary Fanger’s 1D35 Sensation finished on a high note winning race 10 in class and overall to be the only boat in the fleet to beat Pegasus. They finished third in class and 4th overall.

The Hawaii Tourism Authority, Samson Ropes, Full Power and Bacardi Rum sponsor the Waikiki Offshore Series. For more information visit: www.waikikioffshores.com
August 6, 2005
PEGASUS WINS WAIKIKI OFFSHORE SERIES
Michael Roth
808-595-4124

Pegasus Racing and Pegasus 77 Sails To Transpacific Win

HONOLULU — A full moon lighted the way past the Diamond Head finish line for Philippe Kahn’s Pegasus 77 and a second consecutive “Barn Door’ victory in the 42nd Transpacific Yacht Race from Los Angeles early Monday. Kahn’s arch-rival later described the path laid by the lunar reflection on the water as “like sailing down the moon river,’ but Roy E. Disney and his crew aboard Pyewacket were nearly five hours behind in a match of powerful sailing machines.

The Barn Door is a 3 1/2-by-4- foot slab of carved Hawaiian koa wood that goes to the boat with the fastest elapsed time for the 2,225 nautical miles. Four Aloha boats that started five days earlier finished ahead of Pegasus 77 by as much as 15 hours, but their elapsed times were days slower. Finishing at 3:15 a.m. local time, Pegasus 77’s time was 7 days, 16 hours, 31 minutes, 17 seconds, the fourth-fastest ever for the race but nearly five hours off Pyewacket’s record of 7:11:41:27 in a windy 1999 race. Pyewacket’s time this year was 7:21:18:01.

” Records aren’t something you can control,’ Kahn said. “Either the weather was going to cooperate or not. We did break a record for the daily run, and what was interesting about that is we did it without a lot of wind.’ A day earlier, with no more than 18 knots of breeze, Pegasus 77 completed a 24-hour run of 356 miles, breaking the record of 353 set by Magnitude in 1999.

When the wind increased late in the race, Pegasus 77, then in a commanding position against Pyewacket, seemed to have a shot at the record. At the time, Pegasus 77 still had an outside chance of achieving a rare Transpac sweep: fastest-elapsed time and first in class and fleet on overall corrected handicap time.

But, ironically, a 40-year-old Cal 40 whose crew included Pyewacket’s usual navigator, Stan Honey, finished in time late the same morning to correct out on Pegasus 77 by about half an hour. However, Bill Turpin’s Transpac 52, Alta Vita of San Francisco, has the inside track on the honor with about a two- hour edge and needs to finish before 7:12 a.m. local time Tuesday to clinch it.

Illusion was first overall on handicap time through most of the race but slipped back as the larger, faster boats accelerated in stronger breeze. But, flying a full-blown spinnaker in 30 knots of following wind, they flew down through the finish line, surfing at 16 knots to beat nine other Cal 40s in a revival of the class that dominated the race in the late 60s.

The outcome of the Pegasus 77-Pyewacket contest was determined early on, not by boat speed but by strategic differences of opinion.

” We led them past (Santa) Catalina (Island) by a mile, but then we went right and they went left, and they were right and we were wrong,’ Disney said.

The Pyewacket crew was stunned by the second day’s morning roll call and position report that showed Pegasus 77 100 miles south of them.

” We were surprised how low (south) they went the second day,’ said Peter Isler, who replaced Stan Honey as Pyewacket’s navigator.

Then, when the shift they were expecting failed to produce a lively breeze, they had to eat their mistake and give up a lot of miles to find better wind south. That’s when Pegasus 77 came slightly north to drop into a controlling position directly in front.

Mark Rudiger, Pegasus 77’s navigator, said, “It was (wind strength) pressure versus angle, and I’ve learned the hard way over the years that the first half of this race you have to go for the pressure and the second half you can start working on angle. So I just tell the guys, ‘Send the boat the fastest way it can go.’ Speed rules.’

Rich Roberts
Long Beach Press Telegram

2003 Transpacific Yacht Race

Latest News as Pegasus Finishes

A full moon lighted the way past the Diamond Head finish line for Philippe Kahn’s Pegasus 77 and a second consecutive Barn Door victory in the 2003 Transpacific Yacht Race from Los Angeles early yesterday. Kahn’s arch rival later described the path laid by the lunar reflection on the water as “like sailing down the moon river,” but Roy E. DISNEY and his crew aboard Pyewacket were nearly five hours behind in a match of equally powerful sailing machines.

The Barn Door is a 3 ½-by-4-foot slab of carved Hawaiian koa wood that goes to the boat with the fastest elapsed time for the 2,225 nautical miles. Four Aloha boats that started five days earlier finished ahead of Pegasus 77 by as much as 15 hours, but their ETs were days slower.

Finishing at 3:15 a.m. local time, Pegasus 77’s time was 7 days 16 hours 31 minutes 17 seconds, the fourth fastest ever for the race but nearly five hours over Pyewacket’s record of 7:11:41:27 in a windier 1999 race. Pyewacket’s time was 7:21:18:01, the eighth fastest ever.

“Records aren’t something you can control,” Kahn said. “Either the weather was going to cooperate or not. We did break a record for the daily run, and what was interesting about that is we did it without a lot of wind.”

A day earlier, with no more than 18 knots of breeze, Pegasus 77 completed a 24-hour run of 356 miles, breaking the record of 353 set by Magnitude in 1999.

Disney, whose boat has been highly modified since ’99, said, “Both of these boats are much faster than what we set the record with.”

When the wind increased late in the race, Pegasus 77, then in a commanding position against Pyewacket, seemed to have a shot at the record. “We thought about that a lot,” Disney said, laughing. “Quite a lot.”

At the time, Pegasus 77 still had an outside chance of achieving a rare Transpac sweep: fastest elapsed time and first in class and fleet on overall corrected handicap time.

But, ironically, a 40-year-old Cal 40 whose crew included Pyewacket’s usual navigator, Stan HONEY, finished in time late the same morning to correct out on Pegasus 77 by about half an hour. However, Bill TURPIN’S Transpac 52, Alta Vita of San Francisco, has the inside track on the honour with about a two-hour edge and needs to finish before 7:12 a.m. local time Tuesday to clinch it. If the trade winds hold, that is well within its reach.

Illusion, with Honey’s wife Sally and Transpac veterans Skip ALLAN and Jon ANDRON joining Stan, was first overall on handicap time through most of the race but slipped back as the larger, faster boats accelerated in stronger breeze.

The problem was, as Stan Honey said, “If [the wind] picks up from 10 to 20 knots, we go from 7 to 8.”

But, flying a full-blown spinnaker in 30 knots of following wind, they flew down through the finish line, surfing at 16 knots to beat nine other Cal 40s in a revival of the class that dominated the race in the late 60s.

Later, several of the disappointed Pyewacket team, including Disney, greeted their teammate at Ala Wai Yacht Harbour, where Doug Rastello told Honey, “We needed that.”

The outcome of the Pegasus 77-Pyewacket contest was determined early on, not by boat speed but by strategic differences of opinion.

“We led them past [Santa] Catalina [Island] by a mile, but then we went right and they went left, and they were right and we were wrong,” Disney said.

The Pyewacket crew was stunned by the second day’s morning roll call and position report that showed Pegasus 77 100 miles south of them.

“We were surprised how low they went the second day,” said Peter ISLER, who replaced Stan Honey as Pyewacket’s navigator for this race.

Then, when the shift they were expecting failed to produce a lively breeze, they had to eat their mistake and give up a lot of miles to find better wind south. That’s when Pegasus 77 came slightly north to drop into a controlling position directly in front.

Mark RUDIGER, Pegasus 77’s navigator, said, “It was pressure versus angle, and I’ve learned the hard way over the years that the first half of this race you have to go for the pressure and the second half you can start working on angle. So I just tell the guys, ‘Send the boat the fastest way it can go.’ Speed rules.

“Originally our plan was to stay with them, but we decided to sail our own race. Our goal was always to hold at least 30 miles of southing on them to make sure we had a little more pressure but try to put them back on bearing so they had no angle they could get at us with. Crusty did a really good job of masterminding that [plan].”

Crusty is Mark CHRISTENSEN, who was on the winning team in the last two Volvo Ocean Races but had never sailed a Transpac.

“The first couple of days I was having trouble getting a grasp on how far off course we were going,” he said. “Rudi’s [saying], ‘Get south, get south.’ After that we just had to try to think what they were thinking and do the jibes so we’d always set ourselves up between them and the mark.

“We were pretty confident with all our forecasts. It was kind of scary. We just got every shift. Even today, Rudi would say, ‘Well, the wind’s supposed to go to [a compass direction of] 060 . . . be patient, be patient.’ So we waited and waited and finally jibed on 050 and an hour later it was 060 and we came screaming in. The whole race was like that.”

On the last night, sailing in 26 knots of wind in the Molokai Channel, the wind shifted after Pegasus 77 jibed—a quirk that turned into a half-hour shortcut toward the finish.

“Again,” Christensen said, “Rudi could do no wrong.” The young veteran Morgan Larson said, in a way, the race was routine. “I like it when things go wrong,” he said. “It was too easy.”

Rich Roberts
sailing.org

Pegasus 77 Finishes On The Fly

Boat Deftly Navigates 2,225-mile Crossing From L.A. To Honolulu To Win 42nd Transpacific Yacht Race By Nearly Five Hours

HONOLULU Coming in swiftly and silently, almost ghostlike as it streaked victoriously past Diamond Head under a moonlit sky long before dawn Monday, Pegasus 77 very much resembled the mythical flying horse for which it is named. In fact, its captain and crew seemed to make a mockery of the cat-and-mouse game its rival crew aboard the Disney-powered Pyewacket had in mind at the July 6 outset of the 42nd Transpacific Yacht Race — when it raised two start flags, one revealing a fairly famous cat and the other a very famous mouse.

There was no such game.

Instead, the boat with the blue horse emblazoned fashionably on its shiny white hull embarked on a much more southerly route and spent all but the first day well out of sight of its only Division I rival, where it found much breezier conditions and built a lead that would prove insurmountable. Ultimately, Pegasus 77 swooped back north along the same basic line as Pyewacket and “covered” a lead that at one point stretched to 77 miles. When all was said and done, Pegasus had negotiated the 2,225-mile crossing from Los Angeles to Honolulu in 7 days 16 hours 31 minutes 17 seconds — nearly five hours ahead of Pyewacket.

It was the fourth-fastest time in Transpac’s long and storied history and the fastest elapsed time in this year’s race, earning software engineer Philippe Kahn and his crew of professional sailors aboard the sleek Reichel-Pugh 77 their second consecutive Barn Door trophy — the ultimate Transpac prize.

The vessel has an outside chance at claiming overall victory based on corrected handicap time — with a top rating, it has to give various amounts of time to entries in lower classes. But late Monday afternoon, the 52-foot Division II boat Alta Vita was well on pace to finish before 7:12 a.m. local time today, which it needs to claim that honor.

For a time, it appeared as though Pegasus 77 would even steal the elapsed-time record Pyewacket set in 1999, when Disney Vice Chairman Roy. E. Disney breezed across the Pacific Ocean in 7:11:41:27.

Kahn entertained hopes of adding that to his impressive sailing resume late in the race after consecutive days of almost flying across the ocean — including a record run of 356 miles in a 24-hour period leading to the Sunday morning roll call.

But those hopes diminished with the winds before they rose again to enable the early-morning sprint to the finish line, which Pegasus 77 crossed at 2:31:17 a.m. local time Monday, its bulging white sails showing the way. ” We were there to race and we had a great race,” said Kahn, 51, whose 13-year-old-son, Samuel, was on board for his second Transpac. “If the record was to be had that would have been great, but otherwise we’re happy — everybody had a great time.”

Things didn’t go nearly as smoothly for the boat named after the movie, ” Bell, Book and Candle.”

Early problems with the refrigerator left those on Pyewacket with a sour taste that became more bitter as time progressed.

” We had some spoiled milk and some really, really bad turkey, but otherwise it wasn’t so bad,” said Disney, 73, whose official time for his 14th Transpac was 7:21:18:01, the eighth-fastest in race history, which is testament to how fast today’s super sleds such as his Reichel-Pugh 75 have become.

” I saved a big jar of mayonnaise and a few cabbages and we used that later in the race to make coleslaw, which was good because it was something fresh.”

Topping off things, navigator Peter Isler — filling in for the legendary Stan Honey, who left to sail one of the Cal 40s in the Transpac — suffered burns after spilling hot coffee grounds on his right leg.

(Honey flirted briefly with the prospect of beating Pegasus 77 on corrected handicap but failed to do so after coming in a little too late Monday morning.)

Some might have viewed those incidents as bad omens, as Isler and team Pyewacket never could get a good wind in their sails in time for it to amount to anything — despite weather forecasts that led them to take the course they took.

” Sailboat racing is a tough sport,” said Isler, 48, when asked what went wrong. “To a certain extent you want to make a plan and keep sticking to it, but … you have to also be flexible and change your plan part way through.” Disney, ever personable, offered a far simpler explanation.

” They went left and we went right. They were right and we were wrong,” he said. “I don’t know how better to put it.”

* Kahn broke from tradition this year by going far beyond the obligations of the mandatory morning roll call, during which skippers reveal their positions. He kept his position known — as well as a running log — throughout each day on his Web site, www.pegasus.com.

” I think that’s how sailing gets better for everybody because people can watch the sailing and know what’s going on instead of having a bunch of guys sailing and once a day say, ‘Oh, this is our position,’ ” he said.

” So I think what we do is more important because it’s important to make sailing more fun for people to watch.”

Pete Thomas Los Angeles Times

Tech entrepreneur Philippe Kahn wins yacht race

HONOLULU — LightSurf founder and chief executive officer Philippe Kahn won
the 42nd Transpacific Yacht Race from Los Angeles to Honolulu.

Monday, Kahn and crew completed the race, which began July 4, at 3:15 a.m.
local time. Their finish time of seven days, 16 hours, 31 minutes and 17
seconds was the fourth fastest ever for the race.

” Either the weather was going to cooperate or not,” said Kahn. “We did break
a record for the daily run, and what was interesting about that is we did it
without a lot of wind.”

Along the way, Kahn used his company’s technology to keep fans abreast of
the crew’s progress. With wireless technology, he posted messages and photos
from aboard the yacht onto an online captain’s log.

LightSurf designs, deploys and manages carrier-class wireless multimedia
picture and messaging services like Sprint PictureMail. Kahn, now in his
early 50s, founded the private company in 1998 in Santa Cruz.

In 1994, he founded Starfish Software, a developer of software for wireless
devices. That company was acquired by Motorola four years later.
In 1983, he founded Borland International, a maker of professional software
development tools headquartered in Scotts Valley. Under his direction,
Borland grew to employ several thousand people worldwide and post $500
million in revenues.

Born in France, Kahn’s graduate and postgraduate work was in pure
mathematics. In the 1970s, he worked in Zurich, Switzerland, under Niklaus
Wirth on Pascal, the computer programming language.

Kahn was one of the first key programmers for the Micral, an Intel-based
machine developed in France. The machine is recognized by The Computer
Museum as the first personal computer available outside a build-it-yourself
kit.

This marks the second year running Kahn’s team has won aboard his racing
yacht, Pegasus 77. Their boat and one owned by Roy E. Disney, Pyewacket,
were the only two division 1 boats. Ten other ocean racers competed in
division 2.The race, which covered 2,225 nautical miles, began at the edge
of the Palos Verdes Peninsula and ended at the Diamond Head volcano east of
Honolulu.

The prize, called the Barn Door, is a 3.5-by-4-foot slab of carved Hawaiian
koa wood that goes to the boat with the fastest elapsed time.
Besides his consecutive Transpacific victories, Kahn also has won two
Pacific Cup races across the Pacific.

This may be the last match between Kahn aboard Pegasus 77 and the Disney
crew aboard Pyewacket. Pyewacket has been sold to an Asian buyer and Disney
expects his new yacht to arrive in the fall. Pegasus 77’s price is $1.45
million.

KAREN A. DAVIS
Sentinel staff writer

LADY BLEU II THE TOAST OF WAIKIKI FOR A DAY

 

SAILING NEWS _/) _/) _/) _/) _/) _/) _/) _/) _/) _/) _/) _/) _/) _/)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
42nd TRANSPACIFIC YACHT RACE Transpacific Yacht Club
Starts July 1-4-6, 2003 www.transpacificyc.org

July 13, 2003 For Immediate Release

LADY BLEU II THE TOAST OF WAIKIKI FOR A DAY

HONOLULU—Lady Bleu II, an Aloha A class entry, blew into town at mid-day
Sunday to grab its 15 hours or so of fame in the 42nd Transpacific Yacht
Race from Los Angeles, as Philippe Kahn’s Pegasus 77 bore down on Diamond
Head with a one-day mileage record in its log and its sights on a rare clean
sweep in the 2,225-nautical mile contest.

The Reichel/Pugh 77 seemed to put away its chief rival, Roy E. Disney’s R/P
75 Pyewacket, by breezing 356 miles in the 24 hours leading to Sunday
morning’s roll call and was 74 miles in front with 288 to go. The former
record was 353 miles by Doug Baker’s Andrews 70 Magnitude, in 1999.

Roger Kuske, who owns a plumbing and appliance business in San Diego, knows
that his dark blue Dynamique 62 was the first boat to finish only because he
got a five-day head start on Pegasus 77 and the other high-speed, high-tech
racing machines When Pegasus 77 finishes early Monday morning the spotlight
will shift to the boat that has a shot at becoming the first in 10 years and
fourth in history to score a sweep of honors for fastest elapsed time, as
well as first in class and overall on corrected handicap time.

But Kuske will still be parked in the No. 1 spot on Transpac Row at the Ala
Wai Yacht Harbor, and, he said, “We’re happy with that.”

Or, as navigator Barry Ault said as he swigged an island refreshment, “We
are looking forward to greeting everybody else in the [54-boat] fleet.”

Generally, the Aloha boats are either older or more heavily laden with
creature comforts than the single-purpose competitors in the racing
divisions. Sailors call them “furniture boats.” Lady Bleu II, for example,
has three staterooms, three heads (bathrooms to landlubbers), a TV and a
large refrigerator. It weighs 30 tons, about equal to the longer Pegasus 77
and Pyewacket, combined.

“It’s a very comfortable boat,” said Brenda Kuske, who greeted her husband
from the official escort boat at the finish line off Diamond Head. “We did
have a washer-dryer, but we took it out for more refrigeration.”

Such are the sacrifices of the Aloha class, although Ault also said, “We
sailed the boat hard all the time, 24 hours a day.”

Ault was hauled up the mast four times to make repairs. His wife Sally and
Kuske’s 77-year-old mother Helga also braved the heaving seas and 30-knot
winds to meet the boat off Waikiki Beach. The winds were so strong that Lady
Bleu II blew out a spinnaker within sight of the lighthouse that marks the
end of the race but hoisted another well before crossing the line.

Helga Kuske, a native of Germany, told her son by radio, “Honey, I’m so
proud of you. This is the most fantastic day of my life.”

Brenda Kuske said, “This race was one of the top 10 things Roger wanted to
do in his life.”

Lady Bleu II was the race’s frontrunner from the day it started July 1. The
most stressful time was having to surrender most of the lead to seek
stronger winds to the south, well off the direct course to Honolulu.

“We got sucked up into a hole,” Kuske said. “We had to do it.”

But they came out still a few miles in front then stretched their lead
again.

A few other Alohas were projected to beat Pegasus 77 to the finish line, but
Kahn will collect his second consecutive Barn Door award for the fastest
elapsed time, although missing Pyewacket’s ’99 record of 7 ½ days by just a
few hours after suffering light winds earlier in the race.

“Our projections show that we will be crossing the finish line around [5
a.m. Hawaii time],” Kahn said through his Web site, “or maybe a little
earlier, before daybreak. [The wind is] lighter but we are pushing really
hard.”

His remaining goal is to correct out on Bill Turpin’s Transpac 52, Alta
Vita, and Stan and Sally Honey’s Cal 40, Illusion, in handicap time.

“We just realized that we had a chance at top three in corrected time,” Kahn
said. “We really never thought that we’d play in the handicap game. So, now
we have a new goal.”

Meanwhile, Alta Vita still had its hands full of Karl Kwok’s Transpac 52,
Beau Geste, as the two were virtually even, boat for boat, and due to finish
around mid-day Tuesday.

Tracking charts for selected boats or the entire fleet may be viewed by
clicking on the link at the right side of the www.transpacificyc.org home
page. Daily position reports and photos also will be posted until the
completion of the race.

Boats’ handicap ratings may be checked at
www.transpacificyc.org/03/tp03-ratings.html

COMMODORE
Brad Avery
(949) 645-9412
brad@occsailing.com

ENTRIES CHAIRMAN
Bill Lee
(831) 464-4782
wizard@fastisfun.com

PRESS OFFICER
Rich Roberts
Honolulu Press Office: (808) 949-9425
cell phone (310) 766-6547
richsail@earthlink.net

JULY 13 POSITION REPORTS

(Listed in order of corrected handicap time; actual miles to go noted)

RACING DIVISION

Division 1 (started July 6)

1. Pegasus 77 (Reichel/Pugh 77), Philippe Kahn, Honolulu, 288 miles to
go.
2. Pyewacket (R/P 75), Roy E. Disney, Los Angeles, 362.

Division 2 (started July 6)

1. Alta Vita (Transpac 52), Bill Turpin, Santa Cruz, Calif., 529.
2. Beau Geste (Transpac 52), Karl Kwok, Hong Kong, 528.
3. Pendragon 4 (Davidson 52), John MacLaurin, Marina del Rey, Calif.,
642.
4. Grand Illusion (Santa Cruz 70), James McDowell, Lahaina, H.I., 620.
5. Icon (Perry 65), Richard Robbins/Jim Roser, Seattle, 618.
6. Medicine Man (Andrews 61), Bob Lane, Long Beach, Calif., 527.
7. Bengal II (Ohashi 52 ),Yoshihiko Murase, Nagoya, Japan, 734.
8. Helsal II (Adams 60), W.E. Rawson, Melbourne, Australia, 813.
9. Vicki (Andrews 68), Al and Vicki Schultz, Long Beach, 681.
WD—Renegade (Andrews 70), Dan Sinclair, Vancouver, B.C., Canada.

Division 3 (started July 4)

1. Maitri (J/160), Peter Johnson, San Diego, 378.
2. Reinrag2 (J/125), Tom Garnier, Portland, Ore., 373.
3. Innocent Merriment (J/160), Myron Lyon, San Diego, 426.
4. Jeito (J/145), Francisco Guzman, Acapulco, Mexico, 394.
5. Pipe Dream IX (J/160), Scott Piper, Coral Gables, Fla., 509.
6. Horizon (Santa Cruz 50), Jack Taylor, Dana Point, Calif., 558.
7. On Point (Schock 40), Nick Martin, Wilmington, Calif., 606.
WD—The Cone of Silence (Australian Super 30), James and Jenny Neill,
Newport, NSW, Australia.
WD—Lucky Dog (J/125), Peter Putnam, Newport Beach (DH).

Division 4 (started July 4)

1. Wild Thing (1D35), Chris and Kara Busch, San Diego, 521.
2. Tera’s XL (ILC 40), Antony and Daniel Barran, Northridge, Calif.,
527.
3. Hot Tamale (J/120), Tom and Doug Jorgensen, Glendora, Calif., 611.
4. Tabasco (1D35), John Wylie, San Diego, 581.
5. Two Guys On the Edge (1D35M), Dan Doyle, Honolulu, 585 (DH).
6. Cool Man Cool2! (Sydney 38), Harrell Jones, Dana Point, Calif., 630.
7. Swept Away (J/120), Louis Bianco, Seattle, 639.
8. Paddy Wagon (Ross 40), Richard Mainland, Marina del Rey, Calif., 572.
9. Krakatoa (Young 32), Rod Skellet, Sydney, Australia, 686.
10. Bolt (Olson 40), Craig Reynolds, Balboa, Calif., 686.
11. Lawndart (Cape Bay Fast 40), Bill Allan, Nanaimo, B.C., 697.

Division 5 (started July 1)

1. Wind Dancer (Catalina 42), Paul Edwards, Wilmington, Del., 255.
2. There and Back Again (Tripp 40), Robert Rice, Long Beach, 155.
3. Masquerade (Choate 40), Timothy Coker, San Diego, 273.
4. B’Quest (Tripp 40), Challenged America/Urban Miyares, San Diego, 300.

CAL 40 (started July 1)

1. Illusion, Stan and Sally Honey, Palo Alto, 236.
3. Seafire, John T. Harrison, Honolulu, 328.
3. Ranger, William Partridge, Richmond, Calif., 330.
4. Ralphie, Jill and Taylor Pillsbury, Laguna Beach/Eleanor and Davis
Pillsbury, Snowmass, Colo., 330.
5. Flying Cloud, Darrell and Scott Wilson, Long Beach, 348.
6. John B, Greg Boyer, Newport Beach, Calif., 364.
7. Celebrity, Gerald Finnegan, Redondo Beach, Calif., 372.
8. California Girl, Don and Betty Lessley, Point Richmond, Calif., 345.
9. Willow Wind, Wendy Siegal, Sunset Beach, Calif., 365.
10. Redhead, Andrew Opple, Ketchum, Idaho, 454.

ALOHA DIVISION (started July 1)

Aloha A

1. Between the Sheets (Sun Odyssey 52.2), Ross Pearlman, Calabasas,
Calif., 114.
2. Enchanted Lady (Roberts 55 ketch), Andy Sibert, Seal Beach, Calif.,
235.
3. Incredible (Swan 53), Rick Gorman, Los Alamitos, Calif., 163.
4. Beautiful Day (Beneteau 47.7), William Boyd, San Diego, 169.
5. Axapac (Wylie 39), Barry Ruff, Vancouver, B.C., 269.
6. Marla R (Beneteau 50), Jon Richards, Mesa, Ariz., 211.
7. Lady Bleu II (Dynamique 62), Roger and Brenda Kuske, San Diego, 61.
8. Beach Music (Tayana 52), Kirby Coryell, Lafayette, Calif., 374 (DH).

Aloha B

1. Barking Spider (Catalina 38), David Kory, Point Richmond, Calif.,
424.
2. Sea Dancer (Ericson 35), Alvin Wheatman, Marina del Rey, 598.
3. Pipe Dream (Choate/Feo 37), John Davis, Long Beach, 636.

DH—Doublehanded.

WD—Withdrawn.

WIND AT LAST — DOOR OPENS A CRACK FOR A TRANSPAC RECORD

SAILING NEWS _/) _/) _/) _/) _/) _/) _/) _/) _/) _/) _/) _/) _/) _/)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
42nd TRANSPACIFIC YACHT RACE Transpacific Yacht Club
Starts July 1-4-6, 2003 www.transpacificyc.org

July 12, 2003 For Immediate Release

WIND AT LAST — DOOR OPENS A CRACK FOR A TRANSPAC RECORD

LOS ANGELES—Now, this is Transpac. Steady northeast trade winds of 14 to
18 knots have boosted the fleet of 54 boats in the 42nd Transpacific Yacht
Race to their top speeds so far, including near-record one-day runs Friday
into Saturday by Philippe Kahn’s Pegasus 77 and Roy E. Disney’s Pyewacket.

Both averaged 14.5 knots as Pegasus 77 sailed 349 miles and Pyewacket 347 in
the 24 hours preceding Saturday morning’s daily roll call. The record is 353
miles by Doug Baker’s Andrews 70 Magnitude when it finished a close second
to Pyewacket’s record of 7 days 11 hours 41 minutes 27 seconds in 1999.

Though Pegasus 77’s lead is now 60 miles, it still has 636 miles to go in
the 2,225-nautical mile race and would need to finish by 9:41:27 p.m. Sunday
Hawaii time (12:41:27 a.m. official Pacific race time Monday) to beat
Pyewacket’s record.

“The course record can only be achieved at this point if the trades kicked
up to a steady 25 knots,” Kahn said. “That’s very unlikely.”

Behind them, there’s an intense contest between two Transpac 52s: Bill
Turpin’s Alta Vita, San Francisco, and Karl Kwok’s Beau Geste, Hong Kong.
Beau Geste, with Gavin Brady and other New Zealand stars on board, romped
305 miles on the day to close to within six miles of Alta Vita. Bob Lane’s
oft-modified Andrews 61 Medicine Man, Long Beach, is between them, boat for
boat.

At the same time, Alta Vita closed its corrected handicap time gap behind
Stan and Sally Honey’s Cal 40, Illusion, to less than an hour.

Kahn, also charting that contest, noted: “Illusion made a little incursion
north that they seem to have later regretted. They have now gone back south
for more breeze and sailed a few extra miles in the process.”

However, handicaps and head starts aside, the first boat to finish still may
be the Aloha class pacesetter, Lady Bleu II, Roger and Brenda Kuske’s
Dynamique 62 from San Diego, that started July 1, three days ahead of
Divisions 3 and 4 and five ahead of Divisions 1 and 2.

All boats reported Saturday, although Barking Spider, David Kory’s Catalina
38 from Point Richmond, Calif. competing in Aloha B class, has radio
problems and is checking in by e-mail to Honolulu communications officer
Walt Niemczura, who forwards the position report to the communications
vessel Alaska Eagle.

“We’ve been pulling our hair out in worry and frustration,” Kory e-mailed,
“and knowing that someone knows our problem helps a lot.”

Meanwhile, the first Transpac crew reached Hawaii, as Honolulu reporter
Bobbie Jennings told her radio audience.

“That woke a few people up,” she said. “The crew was from The Cone of
Silence, and the Aussies were on their way home (by plane, of course). They
stopped in at the club to thank everyone for their help and support . . .
even though they didn’t finish the race.

“The story goes back to the day they retired. I was sitting at home when the
phone rang. It was a bad connection and it took much repeating before I
heard the word ‘Transpac.’ ‘Oh,’ says I, ‘you must be looking for some
information on the race.’ ‘NO,’ he said—then more static and hissing. I
heard ‘The Cone of Silence’ and recognized the Aussie accent. ‘Oh,’ says I,
‘you are calling from Australia and wanting to know how your boat is doing.’
‘NO!’, he yells. We ARE The Cone of Silence!’

“We finally established our identities and I got the story. They tried to
contact Alaska Eagle or anyone in L.A. without success. They happened to
have the WYC phone number so they tried there. The office staff suggested
they call me.

“I never thought I would hear from them again, much less see them, but by
golly, there they were at our yacht club last night. We hugged and cheered
and shared some mai tais—almost as good a party as they would have
received had their boat arrived at Transpac Row.”

Tracking charts for selected boats or the entire fleet may be viewed by
clicking on the link at the right side of the www.transpacificyc.org home
page. Daily position reports and photos also will be posted until the
completion of the race.

Boats’ handicap ratings may be checked at
www.transpacificyc.org/03/tp03-ratings.html

COMMODORE
Brad Avery
(949) 645-9412
brad@occsailing.com

ENTRIES CHAIRMAN
Bill Lee
(831) 464-4782
wizard@fastisfun.com

PRESS OFFICER
Rich Roberts
Honolulu Press Office: (808) 949-9425
cell phone (310) 766-6547
richsail@earthlink.net

JULY 12 POSITION REPORTS

(Listed in order of corrected handicap time; actual miles to go noted)

RACING DIVISION

Division 1 (started July 6)

1. Pegasus 77 (Reichel/Pugh 77), Philippe Kahn, Honolulu, 636 miles to go.
2. Pyewacket (R/P 75), Roy E. Disney, Los Angeles, 696.

Division 2 (started July 6)

1. Alta Vita (Transpac 52), Bill Turpin, Santa Cruz, Calif., 806.
2. Beau Geste (Transpac 52), Karl Kwok, Hong Kong, 812.
3. Pendragon 4 (Davidson 52), John MacLaurin, Marina del Rey, Calif., 919.
4. Grand Illusion (Santa Cruz 70), James McDowell, Lahaina, H.I., 900.
5. Medicine Man (Andrews 61), Bob Lane, Long Beach, Calif., 808.
6. Icon (Perry 65), Richard Robbins/Jim Roser, Seattle, 896.
7. Bengal II (Ohashi 52 ),Yoshihiko Murase, Nagoya, Japan, 994.
8. Vicki (Andrews 68), Al and Vicki Schultz, Long Beach, 951.
9. Helsal II (Adams 60), W.E. Rawson, Melbourne, Australia, 1,062.
WD—Renegade (Andrews 70), Dan Sinclair, Vancouver, B.C., Canada.

Division 3 (started July 4)

1. Maitri (J/160), Peter Johnson, San Diego, 607.
2. Reinrag2 (J/125), Tom Garnier, Portland, Ore., 623.
3. Innocent Merriment (J/160), Myron Lyon, San Diego, 655.
4. Jeito (J/145), Francisco Guzman, Acapulco, Mexico, 634.
5. Pipe Dream IX (J/160), Scott Piper, Coral Gables, Fla., 719.
6. Horizon (Santa Cruz 50), Jack Taylor, Dana Point, Calif., 734.
7. On Point (Schock 40), Nick Martin, Wilmington, Calif., 848.
WD—The Cone of Silence (Australian Super 30), James and Jenny Neill,
Newport, NSW, Australia.
WD—Lucky Dog (J/125), Peter Putnam, Newport Beach (DH).

Division 4 (started July 4)

1. Wild Thing (1D35), Chris and Kara Busch, San Diego, 745.
2. Tabasco (1D35), John Wylie, San Diego, 784.
3. Hot Tamale (J/120), Tom and Doug Jorgensen, Glendora, Calif., 816.
4. Cool Man Cool2! (Sydney 38), Harrell Jones, Dana Point, Calif., 837.
5. Tera’s XL (ILC 40), Antony and Daniel Barran, Northridge, Calif., 765.
6. Two Guys On the Edge (1D35M), Dan Doyle, Honolulu, 817 (DH).
7. Paddy Wagon (Ross 40), Richard Mainland, Marina del Rey, Calif., 789.
8. Swept Away (J/120), Louis Bianco, Seattle, 865.
9. Krakatoa (Young 32), Rod Skellet, Sydney, Australia, 893.
10. Bolt (Olson 40), Craig Reynolds, Balboa, Calif., 872.
11. Lawndart (Cape Bay Fast 40), Bill Allan, Nanaimo, B.C., 927.

Division 5 (started July 1)

1. Wind Dancer (Catalina 42), Paul Edwards, Wilmington, Del., 430.
2. There and Back Again (Tripp 40), Robert Rice, Long Beach, 346.
3. Masquerade (Choate 40), Timothy Coker, San Diego, 450.
4. B’Quest (Tripp 40), Challenged America/Urban Miyares, San Diego, 464.

CAL 40 (started July 1)

1. Illusion, Stan and Sally Honey, Palo Alto, 407.
3. Ranger, William Partridge, Richmond, Calif., 506.
3. Seafire, John T. Harrison, Honolulu, 507.
4. Ralphie, Jill and Taylor Pillsbury, Laguna Beach/Eleanor and Davis
Pillsbury, Snowmass, Colo., 505.
5. John B, Greg Boyer, Newport Beach, Calif., 531.
6. Flying Cloud, Darrell and Scott Wilson, Long Beach, 529.
7. Celebrity, Gerald Finnegan, Redondo Beach, Calif., 545.
8. California Girl, Don and Betty Lessley, Point Richmond, Calif., 525.
9. Willow Wind, Wendy Siegal, Sunset Beach, Calif., 537.
10. Redhead, Andrew Opple, Ketchum, Idaho, 623.

ALOHA DIVISION (started July 1)

Aloha A

1. Between the Sheets (Sun Odyssey 52.2), Ross Pearlman, Calabasas, Calif.,
304.
2. Enchanted Lady (Roberts 55 ketch), Andy Sibert, Seal Beach, Calif., 409.
3. Incredible (Swan 53), Rick Gorman, Los Alamitos, Calif., 363.
4. Beautiful Day (Beneteau 47.7), William Boyd, San Diego, 355.
5. Axapac (Wylie 39), Barry Ruff, Vancouver, B.C., 454.
6. Marla R (Beneteau 50), Jon Richards, Mesa, Ariz., 396.
7. Lady Bleu II (Dynamique 62), Roger and Brenda Kuske, San Diego, 274.
8. Beach Music (Tayana 52), Kirby Coryell, Lafayette, Calif., 544 (DH).

Aloha B

1. Barking Spider (Catalina 38), David Kory, Point Richmond, Calif., 590.
2. Sea Dancer (Ericson 35), Alvin Wheatman, Marina del Rey, 757.
3. Pipe Dream (Choate/Feo 37), John Davis, Long Beach, 798.

DH—Doublehanded.

WD—Withdrawn.